Writer Case Study: Louise Trimby

Louise has been a regular contributor to Future Content since she started with us in September 2014. As a more established writer, she has enjoyed the variety of work we’ve allowed her to get her teeth into. In her own words…

I’d done bits of writing since I was a child; odd little stories and poems at primary school. Admittedly when I wrote one about a dead bird the teacher did call my parents in for ‘a chat’, but that is by the by.

At sixth form in the late Eighties, very late Eighties, I bought a terrible punk-indie fanzine off someone for a pint of snakebite and filled it with the overly enthused ramblings of an early-adopter NME reader. But I never used the phrase ‘sonic cathedrals of sound’.

And at University I did some student journalism, mainly arts-based, when I wasn’t trying and failing to be a miserable Goth, and reading loads of interesting books, most of them not on my degree course.

After University I let the writing slide until I began working for the Bristol Post and started writing the odd feature on subjects ranging from the Motor Factors Association to trade unions. And I continued with the writing when I began working for Venue magazine. I never saw myself as a ‘proper’ journalist though.

After a few years not writing very much, I began to write for the Bristol 247 website in 2013, and was made art editor for the site and print version in September 2014. It’s a freelance role and I still get to write gig, comedy, theatre and food and drink reviews, and the odd news piece too.

It was indirectly due to a propensity to go to gigs, even at my age,that led me to writing for Future Content. A friend who is involved with the music industry mentioned that her mate was looking for writers. I messaged her. She sent me Stuart’s details. I wrote a test piece for him and was fortunate enough to be taken on as one of their freelancers.

I mainly write about tech subjects and profiles of high-flyers in the tech industry, but have also been given some interesting commissions focusing on DNA profiling and personalisation in e-commerce.

Writing for Future Content is not only lucrative but has also given me an opportunity to learn and develop as a content writer. It’s not like magazine journalism, it’s a whole new and exciting concept and requires greater discipline. I also get to work with a great team, mainly Stuart, Dale and Chris, whose editing skills are second to none and who know content writing inside out.

Any criticism is constructive and positive and it is always helpful to see your work differently and how it can be improved. Writing for Future Content is interesting, excellent for a writer’s self-discipline and something I would recommend to any freelancer. You’ll be working for a young, forward-thinking company with some superb clients and you’ll learn plenty from them. Not least Stuart’s love of a bad pun and Manchester United FC, but you can’t have it all.

 

If you’re interested in writing for Future Content you can find more info on our Content Writers page or you can simply get in touch. If you’d like to see more of  Louise’s articles then check out her author page

 

‘Writing for Future Content is interesting, excellent for a writer’s self-discipline and something I would recommend to any freelancer. You’ll be working for a young, forward thinking company with some superb clients and you’ll learn plenty from them.

Any criticism is constructive and positive and it is always helpful to see your work differently and how it can be improved.’

 

 

 

Louise Trimby

Writer , Future Content

Interested in writing for Future Content?

Details here