Writer case study: Sam Fraser

From scientist to writer

A biologist by trade, Sam started working with Future Content in September 2015 with a view to gaining enough experience to start a career in writing.

Labelling test tubes, watching bacteria grow and making viruses that glow in the dark. My day job is pretty unusual, to say the least.

I always imagined that I’d spend my life working in a lab – until I tried my hand at it and realised that it’s more mundane than mind-blowing.  I spent most of last year toying with other career options, but it wasn’t until one particularly turbulent afternoon last summer that I finally decided science and I were through. I’ve always prided myself on being reasonably good with words – so I took myself away from the lab, grabbed a coffee and surrendered myself to the Google rabbithole. It didn’t take me long to stumble upon this place.

What makes Future Content so appealing to the budding writer is its unparalleled flexibility.  From the moment you’re on board, you’re given a catalogue of briefs spanning a huge breadth of topics, and you’re free to pick the ones that take your fancy. The briefs themselves are well-formed, offering a detailed outline of the task at hand, stylistic tips tailored specifically to the client, and references for further reading.

The beauty of this process is that it can be done remotely, from wherever you and your laptop call home.  This freedom has allowed me to build a portfolio without sacrificing time in the lab (or pub) to do so.  Stu and the team are always on hand if you’re stuck, and the monthly Skype meetings are great for tracking progress and bringing any issues to the fore.  The cash waiting at the end is really just a bonus.

Thanks to the huge diversity of projects on offer, I’m leaving Future Content not only with improved writing skills, but with an almost encyclopaedic knowledge of Japanese cuisine, email marketing, tenancy deposit schemes and coffee beans (the latter of which earned me a blue cheese in Trivial Pursuit just last week).

Most of all, though, working for Future Content has equipped me with the experience that I needed to make writing my career. Next month, I’ll be starting work as a medical writer in Cambridge, combining my aptitude for writing with my re-emerging passion for science.  I know for a fact that my time with Future Content has been instrumental in securing this position: it was certainly a talking point in the interview.

In short, if you’re an aspiring writer looking to build a portfolio, give Future Content a try. If you’re an established writer looking for new and interesting things to write about, give Future Content a try. If you’re stuck in a full-time job, but fancy doing a bit of writing on the side, give Future Content a try. If you’re… well, you get the gist.

“In short, if you’re an aspiring writer looking to build a portfolio, give Future Content a try. If you’re an established writer looking for new and interesting things to write about, give Future Content a try. If you’re stuck in a full time job, but fancy doing a bit of writing on the side, give Future Content a try. If you’re… well, you get the gist.”

Sam Fraser

Former writer, Future Content

Sam’s words

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Spice at a price: The story of saffron

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